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Exploring the Missing Heritability in Subjects With Hearing Loss, Enlarged Vestibular Aqueducts, and A Single or No Pathogenic SLC26A4 Variant

Research Square - Human Genetics 2021
Smits J et al
Jeroen Smits, Suzanne E. de Bruijn, Cornelis P. Lanting, Jaap Oostrik, Luke O’Gorman, Tuomo Mantere, Frans P. M. Cremers, Susanne Roosing, Helger G. Yntema, Erik de Vrieze, Ronny Derks, Alexander Hoischen, Sjoert A.H. Pegge, Kornelia Neveling, Ronald J.E. Pennings, Hannie Kremer

 

 

Pathogenic variants in SLC26A4 have been associated with autosomal recessive hearing loss (arHL) and a unilateral or bilateral enlarged vestibular aqueduct (EVA). SLC26A4 is the second most frequently mutated gene in arHL. Despite the strong genotype-phenotype correlation, a significant part of SLC26A4 cases remains genetically unresolved. In this study, we investigated a cohort of 28 Dutch index cases diagnosed with HL in combination with an EVA but without (M0) or with a single (M1) pathogenic variant in SLC26A4. To explore the missing heritability, short- and long-read whole genome sequencing and optical genome mapping were performed. We found a previously described EVA-associated haplotype (Caucasian EVA (CEVA)) to be significantly enriched in our M1 patient cohort. The haplotype was also present in two M0 cases. Despite extensive genetic analyses, we were not able to prioritize any of the variants present within the haplotype as the likely pathogenic defect, and therefore additional analyses addressing the defect(s) at the RNA, protein, or epigenetic level are required. Whole genome sequencing also revealed splice-altering SLC26A4 variants in two M1 cases, which are now genetically explained, but no deep-intronic or copy number variants. With these findings, we have provided important insights that will pave the way for elucidating the missing heritability in M0 and M1 SLC26A4cases.

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